31 May 2014
23 May 2014

 

Terry Sullivan immortalised Mary Anning with the help of one of the best known tongue twisters that the English speaking world knows:

 

She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore.
The shells she sells are sea-shells, I'm sure.
For if she sells sea-shells on the sea-shore
Then I'm sure she sells sea-shore shells

 

Go for it, daredevils...

 

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13 May 2014

the Buddhists have a term called "samsara", which is this sort of hell-cycle that you can never escape from until you meditate your way out of it...

 

 

as with most generation labels, "Generation X" is a loaded term, first coined and later disowned by Douglas Coupland, author of the 1991 book Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture.. for Coupland, the letter "X" was meant to signify the generation's random, ambiguous, contradictory ways...

 

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10 May 2014
29 April 2014

 

micha³ socha writes on his website:

I have pleasure to direct and animate in BrosFX studio couch gag for the Simpsons. Take a view on a fantastic journey inside Homer’s body you can watch couch gag at Sunday’s episode of The Simpsons, “What to Expect When Bart’s Expecting.”

enjoy..:) 

 


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These mist covered mountains
Are a home now for me
But my home is the lowlands
And always will be
Someday you'll return to
Your valleys and your farms
And you'll no longer burn to be
Brothers in arms..

Through these fields of destruction
Baptisms of fire
I've witnessed your suffering
As the battle raged higher
And though they did hurt me so bad
In the fear and alarm
You did not desert me
My brothers in arms..

There's so many different worlds
So many different suns
And we have just one world
But we live in different ones..

Now the sun's gone to hell and
The moon's riding high
Let me bid you farewell
Every man has to die
But it's written in the starlight
And every line in your palm
We are fools to make war
On our brothers in arms...

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05 April 2014

 

He's the one
Who likes all our pretty songs
And he likes to sing along
And he likes to shoot his gun
But he knows not what it means...

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03 April 2014

The Irish flocked to see a film about the Catholic church's enslavement of so-called 'fallen' women in Dublin, but it is certain to touch a raw nerve in Britain too...

 

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25 March 2014

meine damen und meine herren!!!

it's the first time ever that ccc has announced a quiz show with a prize to be won!!!

here's the task: what's the connection between...?

what you have to do is log in and write your answer.. if there aren't any, the prize remains one of my belongings..

ps. count on customization!!!

 

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24 March 2014

"It is bad when one thing becomes two. One should not look for anything else in the Way of the Samurai. It is the same for anything that is called a Way. If one understands things in this manner, he should be able to hear about all ways and be more and more in accord with his own..."

 

 

Hagakure (meaning Hidden by the Leaves or Hidden Leaves), or Hagakure Kikigaki is a practical and spiritual guide for a warrior, drawn from a collection of commentaries by the samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo, former retainer to Nabeshima Mitsushige, the third ruler of what is now Saga prefecture in Japan. Tsuramoto Tashiro compiled these commentaries from his conversations with Tsunetomo from 1709 to 1716; however, it was not published until many years afterwards. Hagakure is also known as The Book of the Samurai, Analects of Nabeshima or Hagakure Analects.

The book records Tsunetomo's views on bushido, the warrior code of the samurai. Hagakure is sometimes said to assert that bushido is really the "Way of Dying" or living as though one was already dead, and that a samurai must be willing to die at any moment in order to be true to his lord. His saying "the way of the warrior is death" was a summation of the willingness to sacrifice that bushido codified.

After his master died, Tsunetomo himself was forbidden to perform junshi, a retainer's ritual suicide, by an edict of the Tokugawa Shogunate combined with his master's disapproval of the tradition. Hagakure may have been written partially in an effort to outline the role of the samurai in a more peaceful society. Several sections refer to the "old days", and imply a dangerous weakening of the samurai class since that time.

The Hagakure was written approximately one hundred years after the start of the Tokugawa era, a time of relative peace. With no major campaigns to fight, the samurai were transforming from a warrior to an administrative class. His work represents one approach to the problem of maintaining military preparedness and a proper military mindset in a time when neither has much practical application...

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